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News Release | Environment New Mexico Research and Policy Center

Nearly 50,000 Pounds of Toxic Chemicals Dumped into New Mexico’s Waterways

Santa Fe, NM--Industrial facilities dumped 49,786 pounds of toxic chemicals into New Mexico’s waterways,” according to a new report released today by Environment New Mexico. Wasting Our Waterways: Industrial Toxic Pollution and the Unfulfilled Promise of the Clean Water Act also found that 226 million pounds of toxic chemicals were discharged into 1,400 waterways across the country.

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Report | Environment New Mexico Research and Policy Center

Wasting Our Waterways

Toxic Industrial Pollution and the Unfulfilled Promise of the Clean Water Act

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News Release | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Energy Efficient Buildings Would Reduce Global Warming Pollution, Save New Mexican Families $309 Annually

New Mexican families could save $309 every year on their electricity bills by 2030 if the government invests in the energy efficiency of our buildings today, according to a new report by Environment New Mexico. Saving energy in our buildings would also help New Mexico’s fight against global warming, reducing global warming pollution from buildings by 31 percent—the equivalent of taking more than 657,000 cars off the road.

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Report | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Building a Better America

We can save money and help solve global warming by reducing the amount of energy we use, including in the buildings where we live and work every day. More than 40 percent of our energy — and 10 percent of all the energy used in the world — goes toward powering America’s buildings.

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News Release | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

One out of Two New Mexicans Live in Areas Hit by Recent Weather Disasters

After a year that saw many parts of the country hit by scorching heat, devastating wildfires, severe storms and record flooding, a new Environment New Mexico report documents how global warming could lead to certain extreme weather events becoming even more common or more severe in the future.  The report found that, already, one in two New Mexicans live in counties affected by federally declared weather-related disasters since 2006. 

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