Reports

Report | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Renewable Energy 101

America’s institutions of higher education can play a leadership role in the fight to prevent the worst impacts of global warming. Colleges and universities across the country should aggressively deploy clean energy on campus, setting a goal to meet all their energy needs – electricity, heating and cooling, and transportation – with clean renewable resources.

Report | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

The State of Recycling in New Mexico

Recycling rates in New Mexico reveal one of the most wasteful states in the nation. At 19 percent, the statewide rate falls almost 16 points below the national average 34.7 percent, based on the most recent available data. In other words, 81 percent of the waste in New Mexico goes to landfills, incinerators, or spills into the environment. Even the highest local rate, boasted by Lea County at 24 percent, falls well below national average.

Report | For Immediate Release

Renewables on the Rise

Clean energy is sweeping across America and is poised for further dramatic growth in the years ahead.

Wind turbines and solar panels were novelties 10 years ago; today, they are everyday parts of America’s energy landscape. Energy-saving LED light bulbs cost $40 apiece as recently as 2010; today, they cost a few dollars at the local hardware store. Electric cars and the use of batteries to store excess electricity on the grid seemed like far-off solutions just a few years ago; now, they are breaking through into the mass market.

Report | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Troubled Waters 2018

Over a 21-month period from January 2016 to September 2017, major industrial facilities released pollution that exceeded the levels allowed under their Clean Water Act permits more than 8,100 times. Often, these polluters faced no fines or penalties.

Report | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Troubled Waters

America’s waterways provide us with drinking water, places to fish and swim, and critical habitat for wildlife – when they are clean and protected.

The passage of the Clean Water Act in 1972 was a turning point in America’s efforts to protect and restore its rivers, lakes and coastal waters. Though the Clean Water Act has made some progress bringing our waters back to health, a closer look at compliance with and enforcement of the law reveals an overly lenient system that too often allows pollution without accountability.

Over a 21-month period from January 2016 to September 2017, major industrial facilities released pollution that exceeded the levels allowed under their Clean Water Act permits more than 8,100 times. Often, these polluters faced no fines or penalties.

To protect and restore our waters, state and federal officials must tighten enforcement of the Clean Water Act. 

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