Reports

Report | Environment New Mexico Research and Policy Center

Shining Cities 2017

Solar power grew at a record-breaking pace in 2016. The United States now has 42 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) energy capacity, enough to power 8.3 million homes and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 52.3 million metric tons annually.1 Hundreds of thousands of Americans, especially in our cities, have invested in their own solar panels or solar projects in their communities and millions more are ready to join them.

Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Businesses Join Effort to Defend Clean Water Rule from Lawsuit

With clean water protections under attack in the courts, 234 business leaders from 33 states joined Environment America Research & Policy Center in amicus briefs supporting the Clean Water Rule.

Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Local Officials Join Effort to Defend Clean Water Rule from Lawsuit

With clean water protections under attack in the courts, 79 local officials from across the country joined Environment America Research & Policy Center in amicus briefs supporting the Clean Water Rule. 

Report | Environment New Mexico Research and Policy Center

Dangerous and Close

Oil and gas companies are fracking near our communities, polluting our air and water, and risking the health of our children and other vulnerable populations. Fracking often is done very close to vulnerable people – infants, school children, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems – even though communities typically seek to keep industrial activities far away from facilities serving these populations, such as schools, hospitals, nursing homes and day care centers. 

Report | Environment New Mexico Research & Policy Center

Lighting the Way 4

American solar energy is booming. Hundreds of thousands more Americans each year are experiencing the environmental and consumer benefits of clean energy from the sun, often generated right on the rooftops of their homes or places of business.

A growing number of states are leading America’s ongoing solar boom. Those states are not necessarily the ones with the most sunshine, but rather the ones that have opened the door for solar energy through the adoption of strong public policies. The 10 states with the most solar capacity per capita – Nevada, Hawaii, California, Arizona, North Carolina, New Jersey, Vermont, New Mexico, Massachusetts and Colorado – have a track record of strong public policies that are enabling increasing numbers of homeowners, businesses, communities and utilities to “go solar.”

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